Fascinating New Evidence Substantiating the Existence of King Arthur?

The story of King Arthur has been around for a very long time, with the first record of its mention by medieval Welsh historian “Nennius.” He had given a list of 12 battles that took place in different places and times during the Saxon Invasion 500 A.D., several hundred years before Nennius was even born. There is only one surviving source today that speaks of the real-life battle at Mons Badonicus (Badon Hills). Given this information, skeptics have always stayed far away from the story of King Arthur. But Given some brand-new findings on the once perceived Celtic myth, maybe Arthur will find himself a real place in history!

A Needle in the Haystack

Historians have been interested in the story of King Arthur since he rose to stardom in the early 19th century. With different teams of experts looking through historical artifacts from around the world trying to look for clues, and finding nothing. Things seemed to come to a dead end.

A Needle in the Haystack

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Now, with the help of modern technology, experts can look deep into the ground. So, let’s find out who exactly was King Arthur, let’s learn more about the myth, and understand some truths in his existence.

Knights of the Round Table

When Welsh historian Nennius gave his list of 12 battles, he spoke of the warrior Arthur, King of Camelot, who led British forces in a grand fight against the Saxon invaders of the early sixth century.

Knights of the Round Table

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Six centuries later, the Norman conquest of 1066 connected England to northern France, and in its wake came the book that would make Arthur a legend across the world; Geoffrey of Monmouth’s “History of the Kings of Britain” would bring him fame.

A Reason for Everything

The dark ages were a troubling time for the human race. Alcoholism, famine, plague, and war were a constant reality. The story of King Arthur came at the precipice of the Dark Ages, so it’s very understandable that historians were more than skeptic about the truth of Arthurs existence.

A Reason for Everything

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His story until now was almost dismissed as a bluff because of all the discrepancies regarding his presence. Was it a bluff though, or did a King inspire the character?

A Vague Perspective

In Geoffrey’s chronicle, Arthur’s story is told from the perspective of his wizard advisor Merlin, Arthur is given more than just historical battle facts in the book, but also his demeanor is put in the plot.

A Vague Perspective

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Arthur in his story is a bit of a clown, whose father leaves him at a young age; he does not give serious attention to himself focusing on pleasing others. The perspective of the mythical king in Geoffrey’s chronicle is too vague for historians to apply credibility to it.

Small Age Big Responsibility

Geoffrey states that Arthur ascended to the crown when he was only 15 years old. The boy got the throne after his father passed away. But according to Geoffrey succession in those time was not a natural process.

Small Age Big Responsibility

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Arthur had become the crowned king, but he still had to fight numerous battles to save his country and reign from local monarchs. Arthur’s legacy solidified when he managed to defend lower Britain against the Scots and Picts. The man was on his way towards greatness.

The Usual Premise

It makes sense that skepticism surrounds the question of King Arthur’s actual existence. The premise follows a somewhat consistent trend in storytelling across the world.

The Usual Premise

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In Geoffrey’S story, it is written that Arthur came to power while fighting off his nephew “Mordred” as he tries to colonize Arthur’s Vast Kingdom. So, its a fight between blood relatives over land and control; not a very original story, so was it made up?

Powerful Poetry

True or not, the obsession around the story of King Arthur created many cultural pieces throughout the centuries. When French poet “Chretien de Troyes,” wrote the legend of the holy grail, you think he would have had a hunch that it would be parodied centuries later by Monty Python?

Powerful Poetry

source: youtube.com

How about the story of the knights of the round table? It’s said that one out of every three significant deals made every day, are built on a round table. It’s clear that this story made an impact, keep going to find out where the search for its origins began.

Medieval Atlantis

In the 15th Century, a search began for the mythical city of Camelot. Poets fabled it as the beautiful capital of King Arthur’s Kingdom. Camelot was the home of the knights of the round table; it was a place riddled with mysticism and magic.

Medieval Atlantis

source: fandom.com

The 15th-century archaeologists that were looking for it needed a home for all the legends of wars and romances that held dear in their heart; they didn’t find Camelot. Was there another reason for the existence of this fable?

Was it All Just a Metaphor?

If King Arthur is so prominent in British history than why is there no trace of the King in the British monarchy? When you examine Arthur’s story and cross-reference it with when the story was written, then you see that there may be a metaphor in play that references King Henry VIII.

Was it All Just a Metaphor?

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King Henry shares a similar detail in Arthurs fable. He too had to deal with a scandal for the throne when his older brother named Arthur died effectively crowing Henry as King. Was this a way of accusing the King of killing the true heir to the throne?

Finding Clues from the Past

Throughout the centuries, scholars have been looking deep into the literature of King Arthur. They looked at what he ate, where he traveled, who his lovers were, and even what diseases he was reported to have suffered.

Finding Clues from the Past

source: historyextra.com

Every lead would turn another fact into a flat-out fabrication, especially given that records King Arthur began to overlap each other with some being written earlier than others. One Arthur detail was always consistent; he was a strong warrior.

Warrior or King?

Some stories of Arthur speak of a simple man who leads a mercenary group of warriors into battles against much stronger enemies, and others talk about a King who ruled a vast monarchy that was unmatched in wealth and power.

Warrior or King?

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Historians hear the stories of Arthurs power and rule and tend to lean between Roman origins, and a mix of British history all bundled into a myth, so let’s go into one of the primary historical references that could be attributed to the King of Camelot.

The Britons

The Briton warriors or “Arcturus” viewed it as a divine right to protect their land from Jutes and the Saxons. Germanic invaders who ravaged lands and fought hard wars against their adversaries.

The Britons

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Germanic war tactics such as applying fire to swords, arrows, and even lighting wild boars on fire and sprinting them into enemy lines. The Saxons were a feared enemy, it would only make sense that any good story should attribute their existence in it, but where was Camelot in this story?

Possible Locations

Researchers believe that Camelot was built somewhere in Southern Wales. Guesses stretch across the board as to where King Arthur was born. Different techniques such as carbon dating, and historical cross-examination point to King Arthur’s birth at an ancient Castle called “Tintagel Castle” in the Cornwall region.

Possible Locations

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Of all the possible locations, Tintagel Castle seemed to peak the interest of the majority of the researchers investigating the site. All efforts to find evidence of King Arthur’s existence would be futile without the help of modern pop culture.

With the Help of Pop Culture

Although Geoffrey’s account of Camelot is popular until this day, the story was not so original, and without the help of modern pop culture, this story would not stick.

With the Help of Pop Culture

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Countless Movies, books, and even TV shows have been made depicting the story of King Arthur. With big names like Monty Python also picking fun at the story in the movie “Monty Python & the Search for the Holy Grail“, all this stemming from the studies of the fable itself.

Academic Studies

Arthurian literature is taught in universities around the world. With some like Cornwall going the extra mile by even exploring the subject from the archaeologist’s point of view.

Academic Studies

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For centuries the critical studies of King Arthur have fruited nothing to point to a location or proof of the existence of the fabled king. What would need to happen to for scholars to get rid of the burden of proof?

Changing the Plot

When scholar David Carroll came into the scene, he put up some new evidence that re-ignited excitement and brought back some hope to the aging dispute of Arthur and Camelot. Carroll claimed to have found a swiss document that was 1,300 years old.

Changing the Plot

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That accounts and confirms Arthur’s existence. Carroll’s claim was met with skepticism though when he had announced that he would pay 50,000 pounds to the first person who can prove his claim as false. The document stated that Arthur was a 6th century Scottish Monarch. But where does this account leave the Tintagel Castle?

The First Dig

David Carroll swore that he was telling the truth and that his document, among all the others, was the right one for the job.

The First Dig

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It would solve the problem for good, and everyone can go back to enjoying their day, his theory maybe would have stuck were it not for an excavation done in the 1930s at Tintagel Castle. King Arthur was not found, but what was seen, was an older castle deep below it, bringing archaeologists closer than ever to the truth.

A Big Legacy

The excavation was on. As they dug further in the ground, they realized that it was just the beginning of their incredible journey. Not only had they found a treasure of artifacts but also many more thing that completely changed their thought about the place.

A Big Legacy

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They soon found a structure buried beneath the ground. The researchers assumed that the structure was nothing but an old castle by observing the wall. The structure was right under the behemoth that Earl of Cornwall had built in 12th-century. Well, the discovery raised more question then it answered…….

Words on a Rock

After Months of studying the molecular carbon structure of the old Castle deep beneath Tintagel, Archaeologists dated the artifacts and structures to 5th and 6th century AD; the exact period King Arthur was said to have reigned!

Words on a Rock

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Historians were also able to get their hands on a piece of rock that had the words “Home of the King” Written on them. Was this a hint to the existence of Arthur? Arthurian fans will tell you this could be definitive truth.

Just Practicing

The writing on the wall so to speak was met with pretty logical skepticism. Some letters appeared to be written in Latin, some in Greek, and its face value, contained just as much indication of King Arthur’s existence as the bible does of the creation of the earth.

Just Practicing

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In the world of scientific discovery, the evidence goes beyond just accounts or possible hints. Historians believe it could have been the handwriting of a Christian scribe, practicing writing in different languages.

Hope for the Best

The truth is, it’s not going to be easy to prove anything beyond a reasonable doubt. You can believe in Santa, but you’re not going to find him in the south pole, you can seek truth in the Bible’s account of creation, but it’s not going to add up with the scientific origins of the universe, and you can believe in the existence of King Arthur, but you will not find hard facts to support it. That being said, it does not hurt to keep searching.

Hope for the Best

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All you can do is hope for the best, and until the best comes around, there are tons of movies, tv shows, and books you can read that shed light on some wonderful stories of the King of Camelot! Keep swiping if you’d like to see some.

The Sword in the Stone (1963)

Based on a novel by T.H. White. This animated Disney comedy is perfect for a rainy-day movie for families. Like most King Arthur movies, it was met with mixed reviews, but no one can forget the tale of Excalibur and the epic magic fight between Merlin, and Madam Mim!

The Sword in the Stone (1963)

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The film boasts big highlights, and is still proven a popular hit decade later! It would set the stage for the Arthurian movies to come. Some were bigger, more expensive to make and even more dramatic!

Camelot (1967)

Does the name Richard Harris ring a bell? Most people know him as Dumbledore from the trendsetting Harry Potter Trilogy, but did you know that more than 30 years earlier he had given his first go in the world of knights and magic!

Camelot (1967)

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Richard starred as King Arthur in a film adaptation of the musical. The Film won 3 Oscars (Best Art Direction-Set Decoration, Best Costume Design and Best Music) and even referred to the then raging Vietnam War! I don’t know that Harris knew that this experience may very well have helped him to prepare for the part of Dumbledore.

Lancelot of the Lake (1974)

While most of the Arthurian movies focus heroism on King Arthur. These French classic mixes things up! The 1974 film sheds light on the love triangle between Arthur, Lancelot (played by Luc Simon) and Guinevere during the “fall of the round table” Director Robert Bresson took amateur actors.

Lancelot of the Lake (1974)

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But bet on the movie doing good, even if the hero of the story was Lancelot and not Arthur himself. The story of Arthur gives birth to cameoed characters in books and tv shows as well as movies.

Monty Python and the Holy Grail (1975)

Simply said, Monty Python and the Holy Grail is one of the best parodies ever created! The movie still today is featured on cable television during prime-time hours! It picks fun at religion, the movie industry, politics, and gender all under the guise of Camelot and Arthur’s Court.

Monty Python and the Holy Grail (1975)

source: indiewire.com

One Iconic movie fact is when the producers could not manage to bring a horse to set. So they put fake horse heads on broomsticks for the actors to use for the rest of the film.

Perceval le Gallois (1978)

Another classic in its own respect; Perceval le Gallois gives a dramatic twist to the Arthurian premise. The film centers less on Arthur but more on the character Perceval (Played by Fabrice Luchini).

Perceval le Gallois (1978)

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It’s the story of a simple man that went from being a Knight to getting his place on the round table of King Arthur’s Court. The film is inspired by author Chretien de Troyes’s, “Perceval, the Story of the Grail” but it gives a much broader variety of the events depicted in the novel.

Excalibur (1981)

80s movies are a league of their own. You either, love them or downright refute them! Excalibur is a testament to what an 80s film really is. Big strong Knights saving damsels in distress, fighting off the bad guys, and every one shows a little skin, and shares allot of kisses.

Excalibur (1981)

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The John Boorman film had mixed reviews, but was a box-office hit, launching the careers of notable stars like Liam Neeson, Helen Mirren, and even Patrick Stewart! Talk about a date movie. Let’s check out some film too. Good luck finding the first one!

Arthur! And the Square Knights of the Round Table (1966 – 1968)

Arthur! And the Square Knights of the Round Table is an Australian animated series produced between 1966 and 1968 and written by Melbourne playwright Alex Buzo, and British entertainer Rod Hull.

Arthur! And the Square Knights of the Round Table (1966 – 1968)

source: youtube.com

The live action animated show is a fun family classic, and if you look in the right place, you may find one of the rare DVDs still around. They are really rare and really hard to find. As the VHS version was only printed for a limited time in 1992.

Camelot (2011)

The 2011 historical fantasy drama series premiered on April 1st, 2011 being aired by Starz cable network and GK-TV with production beginning during the summer of 2010.

Camelot (2011)

source: rantchick.com

Graham King, Morgan O’Sullivan produced the Arthurian legend, and Michael Hirst debuted with strong ratings and even earned itself a Primetime Emmy Award nomination. The show, unfortunately, would be cancelled due to “scheduling complications” after one season.

Merlin (1998)

The 1998 miniseries initially aired on NBC and retells the legend of King Arthur from the perspective of the wizard Merlin. Sounds familiar right? Despite going back to Geoffrey’s tale of the story.

Merlin (1998)

source: telegraph.co.uk

The film strays from the traditional tale, and keeps merlin alive throughout the whole series, even going into British history as well. The show also had a spin-off sequel in 2006 called Merlin’s Apprentice. But that’s not the only Merlin!

Merlin (2008 – 2012)

In 2008 the Brits tried their hand at producing the story of Merlin with the British fantasy-adventure drama created by Julian Jones.

Merlin (2008 – 2012)

source: telegraph.co.uk

It was broadcasted in September that year by BBC One and held for 65 episodes! The lovely made Syfy is still aired on Netflix US and UK. The show gives a look at the young Arthur and Merlin as they take on a kingdom together!

The Mists of Avalon (2001)

Based on the 1983 novel “The Mists of Avalon” by Marion Zimmer Bradley, and produced by TNT, the miniseries retells the Arthurian legend of the perspective of Morgan le Fay and other women from the tale of King Arthur.

The Mists of Avalon (2001)

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the first episode was the highest-rated original movie of the summer of 2001on basic cable. Part one of the miniseries begins with a dirty, battered Morgaine, riding injured in a small boat through a misty river!

Young Arthur (2002)

The 2002 NBC TV drama depicts the life of a young Arthur coming of age, going through the daily struggles any teenage boy may. Only with a kingdom to rule!

Young Arthur (2002)

source: justwatch.com

The did not do so well and got canceled after one season, but I’m sure director Mikael Salomon and writer Remi Aubuchon had fun while filming it in Prague.

The Faerie Queene (1590)

The Faerie Queene is a three-book epic poem by Edmund Spenser Published in 1590. It was then republished with two more additions in 1596.

The Faerie Queene (1590)

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The poem follows several knights examining different virtues with the text being primarily a symbolic work. Presented to Queen Elizabeth I. The book is known to be one of the longest poems in the English language!

The Hollow Hills (1973)

The 1973 novel boasts the protagonist and the narrator as Merlin, from the moment he supervises the birth of King Arthur all the way until Merlin learns of the magical sword (Excalibur) that he would be taken back to Britain after his death.

The Hollow Hills (1973)

source: wikipedia.org

The Hollow Hills was written by Mary Stewart and this second of a quintet of her Arthurian novels. Merlin is portrayed in his own way all across pop culture, as his role in the story is (according to some) just as fascinating as Arthurs.

I Am Modred (1998)

I Am Modred is a bit of a dark tale, to say the least! Telling of a story where Arthur has a love affair with a half sister that fruits a child, Arthur in the inspiration of the story of Exodus, orders all newborns born on May 30th on a boat to drown.

I Am Modred (1998)

source: kobo.com

His own son Modred was the only one to survive! Modred would be found and raised by a fisherman and his wife. It is almost like an opposite cross version of the story of Moses.

Jaufre (1996)

Jaufre is a verse romance; this is 11,000 lines long! With its main character as an equivalent to sir Griflet of Knights of the Round Table. It is the only surviving Arthurian romance written in Occitan and has modern translations in the Iberian Peninsula and the Philippines.

Jaufre (1996)

source: musicandliterature.org

This is a novel for experts of language and literature so consider yourself warned! The next book may be long but it is a must read!

Le Mort d’Arthur (1485)

First Published in 1485 by William Caxton, the book is known today as one of the best-known works of Arthurian literature. In English “The Death of Arthur” is a rework by Sir Thomas Malory as The Existing Tales of King Arthur, and the Knights of the Round Table.

Le Mort d’Arthur (1485)

source: oldcapitolbooks.com

Malory’s original name for the book before his death was “The Whole Book of King Arthur and His Noble Knights of the Round Table.” I think everyone waited for him to die so they can change the name to something shorter!