The Remarkable Memorabilia and Properties of American Presidents – Huge Mansions and Posh Cars

While the White House, Lincoln, and Ford cars may be the most notable presidential assets, they aren’t the only properties our past president have. The Presidents of America were either born into affluent families or found it somewhere along their ascension to the office. With that sort of wealth, Presidents have some of the extravagant and breathtaking real estate and cars. Some of the presidents bought houses and cars while in office while others have inherited their properties from there wealthy family.

Before becoming the president of America, our former presidents have their lives revolve around their family. They have their own ancestral houses and personal cars. During their term in office, the US presidents defend the constitution, work as commanders in chief, serve the American people and so much more. After they finish their presidential term, they spent most of their lives with their loved ones and enjoyed life with their cars and estate properties. Although some presidents died while serving the country, their memorabilia are the living truth of their legend. Most of the mansions and ranches of the former presidents were designated as National Historic Landmark, while some of their cars were auctioned for charitable purposes and shown in a museum.

Check out the list of Memorabilia and Properties of the American Presidents. The list below started from the very first President down to the last former president of the United States.

George Washington’s Historic Home – Mount Vernon

George Washington served as the first ever US president from 1789-1797. After his term, he only lived two years in his family home in Virginia. Mount Vernon, his beloved home on the banks of the Potomac River in Fairfax County, Virginia was in wrecks by mismanagement and Washington spent his remaining days trying to restore the mansion to its former glory.

George Washington’s Historic Home – Mount Vernon

Source: whitehouse.gov

The estate is an 11,028 square foot space with twenty-one rooms. This house along with the plantation is a reflection of how affluent George Washington was. Initially, Washington’s father Augustine built the mansion, and then, later on, George expanded the house twice. The mansion remained George’s house for the next two years of his life until his demise. When Washington died, he was buried in the family tomb at Mount Vernon. Around this time, the plantation was also the home of United State’s largest whiskey distillery. Entertainingly, its cellar became a location for the “National Treasure: Book of Secrets” movie.

John Adam’s Sanctuary – Peacefield

From 1797 to 1801, John Adams served as the second President of the United States. He also became the first-ever president to live in the President’s House (former name of The White House) in Washington, DC. Adams lost the next election to Thomas Jefferson and returned to Quincy, Massachusetts, where his sanctuary resides – Peacefield.

John Adam’s Sanctuary – Peacefield

Source: mortgageafterlife.com

Peacefield, also known as The Old House was the historic home of John Adams and his wife, Abigail and the four generations of the Adams family. They bought the house in 1787 after a diplomatic trip to Europe. At first, Abigail, John Adams wife, was unhappy about the size of the house, so she did expansions until it was twice its original size. Peacefield was John Adams home before and after his residency. For the first two years of John Adam’s retirement, he isolated himself from the public and seldom left Peacefield, but later on, he engaged a lively interest in public affairs when his son, John Quincy Adams entered the world of politics. Peacefield is now part of the Adams National Historical Park.

Monticello – Thomas Jefferson’s Essay in Architecture

The principal author of the Declaration of Independence and the third president of the United States, Thomas Jefferson retired to his Virginia plantation home, Monticello after eight years in his position. Monticello, or also known as “Little Mountain” was Jefferson’s home since 1770 until his death in 1826. Monticello sits over a lofty hill in Albemarle County, Virginia. The mansion is about 11,000 square feet in size and has twenty-three rooms. Jefferson spent more than four decades maintaining, renovating and designing the estate, which he called “Essay in Architecture.”

Monticello – Thomas Jefferson’s Essay in Architecture

Source: sutori.com

No other president’s home than Jefferson’s Monticello better mirrors the character of its owner. He designed the mansion even though he wasn’t an architect. Monticello is a UNESCO World Heritage Site since 1987. It is considered a national treasure for its splendor and historical significance. The estate reveals a lot about Jefferson, a controversial and complex man whose philosophy in politics deeply molded the American nation.

Montpelier – The Lifelong Home of the Father of the Constitution, James Madison

James Madison left Washington with a solid legacy. He served as the fourth President of the United States, and he was also the founding father of the Constitution and the Bill of Rights. He returned to his lifelong home, Montpelier, located in the Orange County, Virginia after his presidential term.

Montpelier – The Lifelong Home of the Father of the Constitution, James Madison

Source: mortgageafterlife.com

Montpelier is a plantation house with twenty-two rooms. It’s 12,261 square foot in size. When Madison retired from office, many changes were done to the house. The house has one-story wings at each end of the building, creating a duplex. Madison and his wife, Dolley, America’s first “First Lady” lived in the newer section, while Madison’s widowed mother lived in the other section. Throughout Madison’s retirement years, he was involved in public affairs. Madison died in 1836 at the age of 85. His estate, Montpelier was later on restored and designated as a National Historic Landmark. Today, Montpelier is open to the public Monday through Sunday except for Christmas and Thanksgiving.

The Family Home of James Monroe – Oak Hill Estate

In 1794, the fifth President of the United States bought a 4,400-acre land space on which Oak Hill sits on from Colonel Charles Carter. James Monroe and his wife, Elizabeth often visited and stayed at Oak Hill before residing there after Monroe’s retirement from the presidency. Monroe started building his mansion during his term as a president. After his term, Monroe lived with his wife at Oak Hill until 1830.

The Family Home of James Monroe – Oak Hill Estate

Source: whitehouse.gov

Oak Hill’s architecture is distinctive for its unique pentastyle portico. According to reports, former president, Thomas Jefferson designed plans for Oak Hill, while James Hoban, designer of the White House supervised the construction of Oak Hill. After Monroe’s wife died, he moved to New York and sold Oak Hill. Currently, Oak Hill is privately owned and is not open to visitors.

The House of the Red Fox of Kinderhook – Lindenwald

Martin Van Buren was the eight President of America. He earned the nickname Red Fox of Kinderhook because of his birthplace, Kinderhook and his red hair. After his defeat for a second presidential term, he went back to Kinderhook and lived in Lindenwald, the real estate he bought while still serving as a president.

The House of the Red Fox of Kinderhook – Lindenwald

Source: aminoapps.com

This house has thirty-six rooms with a Palladian window and carved woodwork floor. During Van Buren’s retirement, he farmed Lindenwald’s grounds. The estate is located to the south of Albany, New York. Today, the house and its expansive lawns are preserved by the National Historic site. The Lindenwald is open to the public from mid-May to October.

The White House of the West – Grouseland

The White House of the West or famously known as the Grouseland was the residential house of the ninth president of the United States, William Henry Harrison. Technically, the Grouseland didn’t serve as a retirement home for Harrison because he died in office.

The White House of the West – Grouseland

Source: whitehouse.gov

The Grouseland was the colonial home of Harrison in Indiana. It was built in 1804 and was considered the first brick home in Indiana. The estate is gorgeous with its large Georgian architecture style. The White House of the West has an important place in American history because many treaties were signed in its Council Chamber. The Grouseland is currently open to the public and is remarked as a National Historic Landmark.

The Retirement House at Sherwood Forest Plantation

Originally named as Walnut Grove and owned by the ninth President of the United States, John Tyler purchased this estate when he was still in office. He renamed it Sherwood Forest Plantation. It is located on the north bank of the James River in Virginia.

The Retirement House at Sherwood Forest Plantation

Source: nps.gov

After Tyler’s stint as a president, he retired to Sherwood and lived there for the last twenty years of his life. Sherwood is among America’s plantation yards that have everything still in place. It has been the continuous residence of the Tyler family, and the house is known to be the longest frame house in America.

The Ancestral Home of James Polk in Columbia

The only surviving residence of James Polk, the eleventh president of the United States is his Ancestral Home in Columbia. In 1816, James Polk’s father Samuel constructed the two-story house. It is made of fine brick, has a gabled roof, and is shaped like an “L.”

The Ancestral Home of James Polk in Columbia

Source: mortgageafterlife.com

James lived in their ancestral house for six years as an adult. After he became a president, James was a frequent guest of the house, where his mother lived. When Polk retired from office, he visited his mother in April 1849. Two months later, he died of cholera. Today it houses over a thousand objects that belonged to James Polk’s family.

Springfield – The Longest Residential House of Zachary Taylor

Zachary Taylor, the 12th US president, and a military hero lived in Springfield for about 23 years, the longest period he ever stayed in one place. As an army officer, he moved often and never lived long in a particular location. As a president, he didn’t finish his term because he died of cholera in 1850, making him the second US president who died in office.

Springfield – The Longest Residential House of Zachary Taylor

Source: mortgageafterlife.com

Springfield is a two and one-half story house that is built of brick. Zachary’s father constructed the house in 1790 and doubled its size in 1830. The Springfield plantation was also expanded to about 700 acres. Today, the Springfield house is privately owned, but the private owners have allowed the Commonwealth of Kentucky to preserve a historical marker on the property.

The Simple and Clapboard Fillmore House

The Fillmore House is the only surviving estate other than the White House that is related to the 13th US president’s life. Originally located at the Main Street, near Aurora Theater building, the Fillmore house is now a National Historic Landmark. Since 2015, visitors can tour the estate from June through October.

The Simple and Clapboard Fillmore House

Source: aljanh.net

Millard Fillmore built this simple clapboard one and a half story house in 1826 for his wife, Abigail. Their only son was born in this house, and it was also the place where Fillmore began his political career. They lived in the Fillmore house until 1830. Today, the estate contains furnishings and artifacts associated with Millard Fillmore’s life.

Pierce’s Boyhood Home at Hillsborough

Franklin Pierce became the 14th United States President during one of the most tumultuous periods of the antebellum generation. While in office, the apparent tranquility of the Compromise of 1850 shattered. He signed the Kansas-Nebraska Act of 1854 that resulted in “Bleeding Kansas,” which eventually lead to the Civil War.

Pierce’s Boyhood Home at Hillsborough

Source: robertanowlan.blogspot.com

Before becoming the US president, Franklin lived in a two-story hipped-roof house at Hillsborough until he got married. The home was built in 1804. It was a very roomy house with a two-story hip-roofed wood frame. The home remained in the Pierce family until 1925 and later on donated to the state of New Hampshire. Today, the house is operated as a museum.

Wheatland, the Beloved Home of James Buchanan

The beloved home of the 15th President of the United States, James Buchanan, is called the Wheatland. Former president James Buchanan lived at Wheatland for 20 years. In 1856, the house also served as his presidential campaign headquarters. Buchanan gave his first campaign speech to townspeople gathered on the front lawn at Wheatland.

Wheatland, the Beloved Home of James Buchanan

Source: mortgageafterlife.com

Wheatland is a substantial brick house with a Federal-style two and one-half story central part bordered by three-story wings. The house was built in 1828 and was purchased by Buchanan in 1848. After Buchanan’s presidential term, he retired to Wheatland and died years later. Wheatland is designated as a National Historic Landmark. It is open to the public from January to November yearly.

The Only Owned House of One of America’s Remarkable President

In 1844, Abraham Lincoln bought his first and only owned house on the corner of Jackson and Eighth Streets in Springfield, Illinois. The small Greek Revival-style home was smaller when it was constructed, but Abraham Lincoln expanded the estate to two full stories in 1856.

The Only Owned House of One of America’s Remarkable President

Source: nps.gov

Lincoln was the 16th President of the United States. He is known for the Proclamation of Emancipation that led to the abolishment of slavery. He also made ways to preserve the union, and his Gettysburg Address remained one of the best oratory in American History. Sadly, he was assassinated while serving the nation. Several years after Lincoln’s death, Robert Todd (Lincoln’s son) donated their house to the State of Illinois.

Andrew Johnson’s Homestead

In the beautiful city of Greenville, Tennessee lies the “Homestead,” the home of the 17th US President before his presidency and after his term. After Johnson’s successful stint as a tailor businessman, he bought a house on Main Street, Tennessee.

Andrew Johnson’s Homestead

Source: aljanh.net

While in office, the homestead served as a house for Civil War soldier and left it in despair. When Johnson finished his term, he returned home and renovated the Homestead. He decorated the house with political gifts and Victorian furnishings. After his death, three more generations of the family lived in the house. Today, the home is maintained by the National Park Service is designated as a National Historic Site.

The Classic Carriage of Grant – 865 Studebaker Landau

Apart from big mansions, former US presidents were also into carriages, cars and sophisticated vehicles. One of the US presidents who showed love for wagons was the 18th US President, Ulysses Grant. The 865 Studebaker Landau was used during Grant’s term as a president.

The Classic Carriage of Grant – 865 Studebaker Landau

Source: robertanowlan.blogspot.com

Made by Brewster and Co. of New York, it was pulled by as many as six horses, and Grant used it to transport many distinguished guests during his time, including President Hayes, Viceroy Li Hung Chang from China, and King Kalakaua of the Hawaiian Islands. When President Grant retired, he continued using the carriage at his private house until his demise in 1885.

Summer Home of Hayes – Spiegel Grove

Hayes was the 19th President of the United States and served from 1877 to 1881. After his retirement, he returned to his summer home, Spiegel Grove. The house was made for Sardis Bichard, Rutherford Hayes maternal uncle. Based on traditional history, the house was named Spiegel for the reflective pools of water that gathered on the property after a rain shower. Spiegel is a Dutch and German word for mirror.

Summer Home of Hayes – Spiegel Grove

Source: robertanowlan.blogspot.com

The estate started as a two-story brick mansion, but when Rutherford Hayes moved in, he expanded the house to accommodate his big family. After his term, Hayes went back to Spiegel and lived there until his death. The estate was given to the state for the Spiegel Grove State Park, and since then it has been open for visitors.

The Site for the First Front Porch Campaign – Lawnfield

In 1876, James Garfield bought a farm in Mentor, Ohio. The farm was initially 118-acre, but Garfield purchased additional 40-acres for his large family. The farm included a one and one-half-story house that was later on expanded to eleven rooms. Initially, Garfield’s family called the property “Mentor Farm,” but the reporting campers later named it “Lawnfield” during Garfield’s presidential candidacy.

The Site for the First Front Porch Campaign – Lawnfield

Source: nps.gov

Lawnfield was the site for the first successful front porch campaign in 1880. After the election, Garfield became the 20th President of the United States. Unfortunately, he was assassinated six months after his inauguration. Today the Cuyahoga Valley National Park manages the house.

The Elegant Mansion of Cleveland – Westland

Westland was the elegant mansion of Grover Cleveland, the only US president that served the nation for two terms nonconsecutively. He was the 22nd and the 24th US president and was the first president from the Democratic Party after the Civil War.

The Elegant Mansion of Cleveland – Westland

Source: mortgageafterlife.com

Robert Stockton constructed Westland in 1856. The mansion was patterned after Morven, an estate owned by Stockton. After his second term, Cleveland moved to Westland with his wife. Cleveland named the house “Westland” in honor of his close friend Andrew West of the Princeton University. Westland is a two and one-half-story stone house covered with concrete. The Westland is situated in the historic district of Princeton and is now designated as a National Historic Landmark.

The Red Brick Presidential Suite of Benjamin Harrison

Benjamin Harrison is the grandson of William Henry Harrison (9th US president.) Benjamin served as the 23rd President of the United States from 1889-1893. Before becoming the president, Benjamin established himself by becoming a prosperous and prominent lawyer. It was during that time that he moved to the red brick house in Indianapolis. After Benjamin’s presidential term, the house became his permanent residence until his death.

The Red Brick Presidential Suite of Benjamin Harrison

Source: potus.com

The red brick house or also known as the Benjamin Harrison Presidential Suite has 16 rooms. It was built in 1874 to 1875 at the cost of $24,818.67 or equal to $566,242 in today’s money. The house has bracketed cornices and three-story bay window and is inspired by the Italianate architecture style. Presently, the estate is managed by the Arthur Jordan Foundation and is open to the public as a museum.

The Presidential Automobile – Stanley Steamer

William McKinley, the 25th President of the United States, became the first president to ride in an automobile in 1899. F.O. Stanley invented the Stanley Steamer, and he assured the president that it was safe to ride a steam-powered and horseless carriage.

The Presidential Automobile – Stanley Steamer

Source: futurism.media

However, according to reports, McKinley didn’t enjoy his rides. While McKinley didn’t have the best first-time experience in riding an automobile, it is known that he took at least two more automobile rides, one in Canton, Ohio and the other one in Patterson, New Jersey. The Stanley Steamer Company that built the Stanley Steamer lasted until 1924 only.

The Head of the Tribe – Sagamore

Sagamore Hill was the home of the 26th President of the United States, Theodore Roosevelt. He lived in Sagamore from 1885 until his death in 1919. While Theodore was president, people viewed his house as the “Summer White House” because he often stayed there during summer.

The Head of the Tribe – Sagamore

Source: aminoapps.com

Roosevelt initially planned to name his house as “Leeholm” after his wife, Alice Lee, but she died in 1884. Theodore remarried 2 years after and he decided to name the estate “Sagamore Hill.” Sagamore means the Head of the Tribe. Nowadays, visitors can explore the house, which is currently known as the Sagamore Hill National Historic Site.

The Childhood Home of William Howard Taft

High above one of Cincinnati’s most prominent peaks stands the childhood home of William Howard Taft, the 27th US president. Alphonso Taft, William’s father, bought the house with its accompanying 1.81-acres on June 13, 1851. William Taft was born in this two-story Greek Revival-style house.

The Childhood Home of William Howard Taft

Source: zazzle.com

During the years that William Taft lived in this house, he learned his first passion, which was Law and he also absorbed the beliefs and commitment of his family to the Republican Party. In 1877, a fire damaged the roof and the second floor of the house. The house was then leased in 1889, and when Alphonso died, Louise sold it in 1899. Today the house is a National Historic Site and is under renovations

Edith’s Gift – Woodrow Wilson House

Woodrow Wilson served as the 28th President of the American nation from 1913 to 192. He is known for his Democratic and World Peace Advocacy and dubbed by historians as one of the best US Presidents. Apart from being remarked as a great president, Woodrow was a loving husband. The Woodrow Wilson House in Washington was his surprise gift to Edith (Woodrow’s wife).

Edith’s Gift – Woodrow Wilson House

Source: zazzle.com

In the 1920s, when Woodrow’s term was ending, he began looking for a retirement residence in Washington. On December 14, Woodrow told his wife to attend a concert, and when Edith came back, Wilson gave her the deed to the house. Woodrow Wilson made several modifications to the house, including a one-story brick garage, billiard room, and book-lined study. He lived in the house until his death in 1924, while Edith lived until 1964. Edith left the management of the house and its furnishings to the National Trust for Historic Preservation.

Queen Anne Style House of Harding

The Queen Anne Style House in Marion, Ohio was the home of the 29th President of the United States. Florence, Harding’s wife, designed the house in 1890, and they lived there for 30 years before Harding’s presidency. The dark green frame estate, painted in cream with an expansive front porch served as Harding’s front-porch campaign site.

Queen Anne Style House of Harding

Source: aljanh.net

Harding was always loyal to his friends, but it turned out damaging when his appointees became corrupt. In more than two years of serving as a president, Harding suddenly died from a heart attack. His scandals broke out after his death. After Harding’s untimely demise, his wife left their house to the Harding Memorial Association. Presently, the Ohio Historical Society is operating the house as a museum.

One of Coolidge’s Few Memorabilia – 1923 Lincoln L Series Car

Vice President Calvin Coolidge ascended the Presidential position in 1923 when Warren Harding suddenly died in office. Coolidge became the 30th US President. He was known as a small government conservative and restored the public trust in the White House after the scandal of his predecessor’s administration.

One of Coolidge’s Few Memorabilia – 1923 Lincoln L Series Car

Source: zazzle.com

Coolidge didn’t leave a lot of memorabilia, but according to reports, he used a 1923 Lincoln car. This car was first built in 1920 and was bought for Coolidge in May 1923. The aluminum-bodied sedan was shown in the Vermont History Expo in 2007.

Hoover’s Favorite Car – The Gorgeous Cadillac V-16

In 1929, the motor vehicle became a way of life. Herbert Hoover, the 31st President of the United States, bought a Cadillac V-16 before the end of his office term. While Hoover rode a Pierce-Arrow and Packard during his term as a president, he purchased a Cadillac and retired from office with it.

Hoover’s Favorite Car – The Gorgeous Cadillac V-16

Source: mortgageafterlife.com

The Cadillac V-16 Imperial limousine was the work of Owen Nacker, Cadillac’s engine designer. Unlike the other presidential cars, the Cadillac V-16 is personally owned by Hoover, and that’s why he brought it with him when he finished his term. Hoover retired in Palo Alto California and died in 1964 from Colon Cancer.

The Coolest Car of FDR – Packard 12

Franklin D. Roosevelt, also known as FDR, was the 32nd President of the United States. He served the nation for four terms and led American during the Great Depression and World War II. FDR is paralyzed from the waist down, but his illness didn’t prevent him from becoming the president of America and driving his classy cars.

The Coolest Car of FDR – Packard 12

Source: mortgageafterlife.com

FDR is a car and driving enthusiast. Despite his condition, he managed to drive his cars that were outfitted with special hand controls. One of the coolest cars of FDR during his term was the Packard 12. He loved this car because it was larger than his other cars, giving him more room to maneuver. Franklin D. Roosevelt also had other famous car models, including the 1938 Ford Convertible Coupe, 1936 Ford Phaeton and the “Sunshine Special” 1939 Lincoln K series Limousine.

A Long Time Chrysler Man, Truman with his Chrysler Newport

Harry Truman ascended office after the death of Franklin D. Roosevelt and became the 33rd President of the United States. He instigated the Marshall Plan to restore the economy of Western Europe, and he also established the NATO and Truman Doctrine.

A Long Time Chrysler Man, Truman with his Chrysler Newport

Source: aljanh.net

Truman was a longtime lover of Chrysler cars. During his lifetime, he owned several Chrysler cars. Six months after his death, Truman bought the 1972 Chrysler Newport. The National Park Service is maintaining the car these days. The car’s license plate number is 5745. The numbers mean Victory in Europe Day.

The Stunning Cadillac Eldorado of Dwight Eisenhower

Eisenhower was a commanding general of the victorious soldiers in Europe during WWII. When he became the 34th US president, he got a truce in Korea while maintaining to ease the tensions of the Cold war. Apart from political activities, Eisenhower also got to ride in one of the very first Cadillac Eldorado.

The Stunning Cadillac Eldorado of Dwight Eisenhower

Source: aljanh.net

Dwight Eisenhower is known to many as a real-car lover. During his first parade in 1953, Eisenhower was so delighted on riding the Cadillac. This car symbolized the apex in the history of designing automobiles with more exciting features such as the first wraparound windscreen.

The Classic Ford Thunderbird of John F. Kennedy

John F. Kennedy had an eye for classic cars when he saw one in the design of the 1961 Ford Thunderbird. The vehicle was T-Bird convertible a with a 1963 Hardtop. It was featured in Kennedy’s inaugural parade, and it was reported that it was his last car driven before his assassination.

The Classic Ford Thunderbird of John F. Kennedy

Source: whitehouse.gov

The 35th President of the United States, John F. Kennedy was the first Roman Catholic to hold the presidential office. He was known for the Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty and the Alliance Progress. Kennedy was killed in 1963 while traveling in a presidential motorcade in Dallas.

A Boat or A Car? – The Amphicar of Lyndon Johnson

Lyndon Johnson assumed the presidency when JFK died. He was the 36th US President. He was known for the progressive reforms aimed at building a “Great Society” for all Americans. Some of his programs where Head Start, Voting Rights, Civil Rights Act and Medicare. While Johnson is known for being a great president, he was also a prankster.

A Boat or A Car? – The Amphicar of Lyndon Johnson

Source: whitehouse.gov

Johnson used a car-boat hybrid to prank his friends. Quandt Group at Berlin-Borsigwalde and Lübeck made the amphibious car or Amphicar.  It was one of the few Amphicar to enter mass production. The Amphicar had front-wheel steering for land and water. It also had two propellers below the rear engine compartment.

Nixon Checkers – Oldsmobile Car

Nixon was the only president ever to resign from office. He served the country from 1969 to 1974. Nixon used his Oldsmobile for political mileage during his Checkers speech while being investigated for possible suspect campaign contributions. He mentioned during his speech that his car is a symbol of his average lifestyle and that he was someone trustworthy.

Nixon Checkers – Oldsmobile Car

Source: robertanowlan.blogspot.com

The 1950 Oldsmobile has an old rocket V8 engine and a 5.0-liter powerplant. During Nixon’s time, the car was overpowering. It outlived Nixon’s career in politics. When the ’73/’74 Watergate scandal came out in public, Nixon was never convicted because he resigned as a president.

The Modest Home of Carter

The 39th president of the United States, Jimmy Carter is living a modest life in his house in Georgia. Many considered Carter as the nation’s greatest former president. He has emerged as a leader of human rights and worked for numerous charitable causes after he retired.

The Modest Home of Carter

Source: sutori.com

At 94, Carter still lives with his wife, Rosalyn, in the two-bedroom ranch house in Plains, Georgia. They built the house in 1961 with an estimated value of 167 thousand dollars. As of today, Jimmy and Rosalyn cook their own meals and attend their local Baptist church.

Cross Country with 1948 Studebaker Commander

According to reports, the first ever car that Carter was able to drive in his life was a 1948 Studebaker Commander. Carter never disclosed how much the car cost but he managed to take good care of it throughout the years.

Cross Country with 1948 Studebaker Commander

Source: sutori.com

In the late 1940s, he was able to do a cross-country drive with his Studebaker Commander. Jimmy Carter served as a Governor of Georgia before becoming a president. He is known for being the oldest living former US president at 94.

The Most Loved Car of Reagan – 1962 Willy’s CJ-6

The 1962 Willy’s CJ-6 is the most beloved car of the 40th president of the United States. Jeep CJ model cars are designed with various little off-road vehicles with open bodies. It was not a luxury car, but this car is as tough as it comes.

The Most Loved Car of Reagan – 1962 Willy’s CJ-6

Source: robertanowlan.blogspot.com

This car is associated with important events and people in American history. While it battered from decades of use, Reagan often drove the car for ranch duty during his stays at the Western White House while in office.

The Breathtaking Bush Family Compound

Located along the Atlantic ocean in the northeast United States is the breathtaking bush compound. Dubbed as the Summer White House of the 41st president of the United States, the Bush compound has a direct view of the ocean. It is a place of escape for the Bush family every summer.

The Breathtaking Bush Family Compound

Source: robertanowlan.blogspot.com

Bush’s great grandfather purchased the property in the late 19th century. Bush lived most of his childhood in this estate and while in office, he and his wife spent most of their summer in this compound. The former president passed away last year, and in 2015, it was reported that Jeb Bush was building a home in Bush compound.

The Bright Little Studebaker of George H.W. Bush

George H.W. Bush owned a sleek, bright colored little Studebaker when he was in his 40s. The car was introduced in June 1946 as a 1947 model at the Studebaker factory in Indiana. An “L” head six-cylinder engine with a 94hp of power powered the car. It also featured a 3-speed manual gearbox.

The Bright Little Studebaker of George H.W. Bush

Source: futurism.media

The bright little Studebaker had a redesigned suspension and chassis to offer more comfortability to its user. Bush didn’t disclose the amount of his car, but if you look at today’s market, the car is around 21.5 thousand dollars if purchased. This car is currently being displayed at the George Bush Presidential Library and Museum.

Bill’s Favorite Treasure – 1967 Ford Mustang

Bill Clinton was the 42nd president of the United States. He served the nation from 1993 to 2001. During his term, America enjoyed years of prosperity and peace, marked by low crime rates, and low unemployment. Today, Clinton is touring with his wife, Hillary, around North America for their conversation show series.

Bill’s Favorite Treasure – 1967 Ford Mustang

Source: whitehouse.gov

Before becoming a president, Bill Clinton owned an ice blue 1967 Ford Mustang. It was his favorite treasure. He even once stated that he regretted leaving it behind when he became the US president. The 1967 Ford Mustang was a convertible with a hardtop roof operated electronically.

The Lively Prairie Chapel Ranch of George W. Bush

The home of the 43rd US president is situated northwest of Crawford, Texas. The ranch is covered with lively, colorful and beautiful flowers with a tree farm. The 1600-acre property was made in such a way that no one would want to leave the place.

The Lively Prairie Chapel Ranch of George W. Bush

Source: futurism.media

Kenneth Blasingame designed the interiors, Michael Williams did the landscaping, and Architect David Heymann conceived the house. The ranch is the perfect getaway place for Bush and his wife because of the relaxing and breathtaking nature around the main house. Upon leaving office, Bush returned to Texas and lived at his beloved Prairie Chapel Ranch.

The Beloved Truck at Prairie Chapel Ranch

George W. Bush is second to John Quincy Adams as the only president in American history that took up office following his father (George H. W. Bush). After his term in 2009, George W. Bush returned to live in Prairie Ranch and bought himself an F-150 4×4 pickup.

The Beloved Truck at Prairie Chapel Ranch

Source: whitehouse.gov

The white 2009 F-150 4×4 pickup was the beloved truck of George when he resided in Prairie. He used the car to work around the ranch and entertain friends and foreign dignitaries visiting the Prairie property. This pickup is a 5.4-liter V8 engine with automatic transmission. It also features a powerful 310hp. The truck was later on sent to Barret-Jackson, and it raised 300 thousand dollars for charity.

The New House at Kalorama

Barack Obama was the first African American president. He served as the 44th president of the United States from 2001-2009. After his term in the White House, he moved with his family to the Kalorama neighborhood. Obama rented an 8,200 square foot house in Washington but later bought the house for 8.1 million dollars.

The New House at Kalorama

Source: whitehouse.gov

The home is the second most expensive property in the Kalorama neighborhood. It has eight bedrooms with a gated courtyard. The house was built in the 1920s and was renovated in 2011. Based on reports, Obama had a pool installed in his property.

Environmentally Green Ford Escape Hybrid of Obama

Barack Obama was a big enthusiast of his classy Chrysler 300C sedan. However, the 300C was not fuel efficient and since Obama was advocating environmental reform. This is the main reason why he traded his Chrysler 300c to an environmentally green Ford Escape Hybrid car.

Environmentally Green Ford Escape Hybrid of Obama

Source: futurism.media

The 2007 Ford Escape Hybrid had better fuel efficiency, and he used during his candidacy. When he became the US president, he had to hand over his driving privileged to the Secret Service. Fortunately, he got a sweet consolation prize, the Presidential limousine called the “Beast.”

Mike Pence’s Official Residence – Number One Observatory Circle

The 48th Vice President of the United States and currently the Vice President in position is none other than Mike Pence. While everyone knows the White House, few people know that the Vice President is entitled to an official residence.

Mike Pence’s Official Residence – Number One Observatory Circle

Source: futurism.media

The Number One Observatory Circle, situated on the grounds of the US Naval Observatory in Washington is the official residence of Vice President Mike Pence. This property has been the official residence of the American Vice Presidents since 1974.